The Feeding of the Beasts: A Year’s Food For The “Zoo’s” Collection
From Shrimps To Rats; And From Onions To Oil-Cakes And Mice: The Food Consumed By The Animals At The “Zoo” During 1912
Artist: W. B. Robinson

in: Illustrated London News, May 17, 1913
XL size here.

The Feeding of the Beasts: A Year’s Food For The “Zoo’s” Collection

From Shrimps To Rats; And From Onions To Oil-Cakes And Mice: The Food Consumed By The Animals At The “Zoo” During 1912

Artist: W. B. Robinson

in: Illustrated London News, May 17, 1913

XL size here.

In Memory of the 1,104,890 British Dead of the Great War
The image represents all of the war dead of the British Empire during WWI, depicted as a column of men which would extend from the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, to Durham.

The effort made by the British Empire during the Great War – an effort whose magnitude is not, perhaps, always fully appreciated abroad – was emphasized on Armistice Day in a broadcast address on War Graves given by Major-General Sir Fabian Ware. His subject was “Some Corner of a Foreign Field.” He said that 900,000 of the million dead of the Empire were strange to arms when the war-cloud burst, but yet as soldiers they died, and as soldiers they had been saluted. He then imagined the column of the dead which is illustrated on this page, the men moving in one long column, four abreast – “as the head of that column reached the Cenotaph the last four men would be at Durham” – and kindred columns marching in other parts of the Empire.

Artist: D. MacPherson
in: The Illustrated London News, November 18, 1933
XL size here.
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In Memory of the 1,104,890 British Dead of the Great War

The image represents all of the war dead of the British Empire during WWI, depicted as a column of men which would extend from the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, to Durham.

The effort made by the British Empire during the Great War – an effort whose magnitude is not, perhaps, always fully appreciated abroad – was emphasized on Armistice Day in a broadcast address on War Graves given by Major-General Sir Fabian Ware. His subject was “Some Corner of a Foreign Field.” He said that 900,000 of the million dead of the Empire were strange to arms when the war-cloud burst, but yet as soldiers they died, and as soldiers they had been saluted. He then imagined the column of the dead which is illustrated on this page, the men moving in one long column, four abreast – “as the head of that column reached the Cenotaph the last four men would be at Durham” – and kindred columns marching in other parts of the Empire.

Artist: D. MacPherson

in: The Illustrated London News, November 18, 1933

XL size here.

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The Futility of Herr Rudolf Martin’s Plan of Invasion by Aeroplane

Nothing could show better the futility of Government Councillor Rudolf Martin’s idea that Germany could construct 50,000 flying-machines for £50,000,000 and starting these from Calais, could land 100,000 men on the Kentish coast within half an hour, than this imaginary illustration of the landing of such an army on our shores. Leaving out of the question that ease with which a compact body of aeroplanes could be damaged by our artillery fire, there remains the impossibility of landing such an army in reasonable formation. A Wright aeroplane, for instance, calls for as much room as a section of infantry in close formation, which means that each aeroplane carrying two men would occupy the space of eighty men of an ordinary army. Thus ground that would hold an ordinary army of 4,000,000 men would only hold an army of 100,000 men of an aeroplane corps. Herr Martin’s lecture, it need hardly be said, has been received as a welcome contribution to the gaiety of nations. 

in:  The Illustrated London News, 19 December 1908
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XL size here.

The Futility of Herr Rudolf Martin’s Plan of Invasion by Aeroplane

Nothing could show better the futility of Government Councillor Rudolf Martin’s idea that Germany could construct 50,000 flying-machines for £50,000,000 and starting these from Calais, could land 100,000 men on the Kentish coast within half an hour, than this imaginary illustration of the landing of such an army on our shores. Leaving out of the question that ease with which a compact body of aeroplanes could be damaged by our artillery fire, there remains the impossibility of landing such an army in reasonable formation. A Wright aeroplane, for instance, calls for as much room as a section of infantry in close formation, which means that each aeroplane carrying two men would occupy the space of eighty men of an ordinary army. Thus ground that would hold an ordinary army of 4,000,000 men would only hold an army of 100,000 men of an aeroplane corps. Herr Martin’s lecture, it need hardly be said, has been received as a welcome contribution to the gaiety of nations. 

in:  The Illustrated London News, 19 December 1908

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XL size here.