scanzen:

grofjardanhazy:

konzervativanarchista:

Ha tudni akarod, miért is veti szét az ideg a lengyeleket a kelet-európai háborúzás hallatán, nézd meg nagyban ezt a pár színes légifotót az 1945-ös Varsóról.

ugyanaz a helyzet, mint Aleppóban most.

tudom, a lényegen nem változtat, de ezek nem színes légifotók a 2. vh-ból, hanem CG alkotások, illetve pár frame ebből a 2011-es animációból:

https://vimeo.com/16582392

antoneutron:

neukurucz:

historicaltimes:

KGB Agent Vladimir Putin posing as family member during Reagan’s visit to Russia 1988

Kibaszott nagy SWÁG ez az ember! Imádom!

az öreg Reagen biztos csudálkozott volna, ha azt mondják itt neki, hogy a kisfiú papája lesz majd Oroszország első embere!

Putyin a szóban forgó időszakban feleségével együtt Drezdában tartózkodott, a képen látható apuka egyszerűen csak erősen hasonlít az évezred legférfiasabb vezetőjére. :( Kár.

antoneutron:

neukurucz:

historicaltimes:

KGB Agent Vladimir Putin posing as family member during Reagan’s visit to Russia 1988

Kibaszott nagy SWÁG ez az ember! Imádom!

az öreg Reagen biztos csudálkozott volna, ha azt mondják itt neki, hogy a kisfiú papája lesz majd Oroszország első embere!

Putyin a szóban forgó időszakban feleségével együtt Drezdában tartózkodott, a képen látható apuka egyszerűen csak erősen hasonlít az évezred legférfiasabb vezetőjére. :( Kár.

How North Koreans ads in western newspapers backfired | NK News

On October 8, 1985 The New York Times ran a full-page advertisement with the headline, “Korea Has Given Birth To One More Great Hero.” The ad featured a book “authored” by the “hero” Kim Jong Il (who was actually born in 1941, not the 1980s). Strange as it may sound today, North Korean ads such as this were relatively common in major Western newspapers from 1969 to as late as 1997.

In an attempt to impress the West during the Cold War (and beyond), the North Korean government placed full-page ads in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Irish Times, The London Times, The London Evening Standard, The Sun, The Boston Globe and The Washington Post touting the exploits of Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong Il, the Juche ideology and the reunification of Korea. An exact number of how many North Korean ads appeared in these newspapers is unknown but at least 100 were published from 1969-1997. However, the placement of ads in major Western newspapers harmed North Korea’s already unfavorable reputation abroad and proved that North Korean officials were truly out of touch with reality.

In the West, the ads became a source of jokes and demonstrated the over-the-top nature of the Kim family personality cult. One 1972 Guardian reader, in a letter to the editor, said “Kim Il Sung’s personality cult makes Joe Stalin look like Howard Hughes.” A 1969 Boston Globe reader called Kim Il Sung a “megalomaniac” as “he has spent approximately $50,000 of his country’s hard-earned foreign currency taking advertisements in some of the world’s leading newspapers. The objective: to blow his own kazoo.”

Western readers expressed confusion as to why the North Korean government would pay for these advertisements with bizarre titles such as, “All Efforts to Attain The Goal of Eight Million Tons of Grain.” The ads were part of North Korea’s campaign, beginning in the late 1960s, to promote Kim Il Sung and Juche on the world stage and win support for the DPRK’s position on reunification. However, even supporters of North Korea criticized their international propaganda campaign. Sean Garland of the Irish Republican Army visited North Korea in 1983 and told his Korean comrades that putting full-page ads expressing Kim Il Sung’s ideas into the Irish Times of “was a waste of money because nobody f—ing read them.” In many of the ads, the North Koreans were promoting the published works of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il, but as one Boston Globe reader wrote in a 1969 letter to the editor, “To date, sales have been few. Most people in the Western world have never heard of Kim, or awaited anything from him except trouble.”

Funded by the North Korean government, the Chongryon, a group of pro-DPRK ethnic Koreans in Japan operated as the intermediaries in North Korea’s world propaganda campaign and paid the newspapers for the placement of the full-page ads. Each of these ads cost anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000. In one instance, they placed an ad in a Middle East newspaper proclaiming, “Kim Il Sung Is a Divine Man,” which did not go over well with devout Muslim readers. In another example that highlights their unrealistic expectations, the Chongryon promised a Tokyo-based publishing company, Miraisha, that they would sell at least 30,000 copies of Kim Il Sung’s biography. Predictably, Kim Il Sung’s biography was not well-received by the international community.

More

We don’t really want to know how bad that smells, but apparently, a man who was recently arrested in Hebei, China, managed to make a police officer throw up because of his foul breath.

Hebei News reports the arrest of a 49-year-old man, Er-mao Wang, after hiding from the police for over a year. Wang and two friends committed a crime of theft on July 4, 2013, stealing a motorbike worth 3,000 Chinese yuan (US$488), the three of them making their escape from the scene of the crime on said bike. When the police caught up, one of the three men got arrested on the spot while Wang and his other accomplice split ways and managed to get away.
For the past year, Wang, who is single, had been leading a nomad-like lifestyle, moving from place to place, hiding in the mountains and taking on random temporary jobs. The police received a tip about Wang’s whereabouts earlier this month, and finally caught him after searching for him for the past year.
When the police found him, Wang had unkempt hair covered in dust and dirt and he looked like he hadn’t groomed himself in years. The effects of his unstable living conditions not only showed in his appearance, but made a big impact on his body odor as well. Wei-min Ren, who was tasked with questioning Wang on the journey back to the police station, had the short end of the stick as he had to suffer direct assault from Wang’s bad breath.
It was reported that Ren had an incredibly difficult time keeping himself together during the ride, and immediately threw up upon arriving at their destination.

We don’t really want to know how bad that smells, but apparently, a man who was recently arrested in Hebei, China, managed to make a police officer throw up because of his foul breath.

Hebei News reports the arrest of a 49-year-old man, Er-mao Wang, after hiding from the police for over a year. Wang and two friends committed a crime of theft on July 4, 2013, stealing a motorbike worth 3,000 Chinese yuan (US$488), the three of them making their escape from the scene of the crime on said bike. When the police caught up, one of the three men got arrested on the spot while Wang and his other accomplice split ways and managed to get away.

For the past year, Wang, who is single, had been leading a nomad-like lifestyle, moving from place to place, hiding in the mountains and taking on random temporary jobs. The police received a tip about Wang’s whereabouts earlier this month, and finally caught him after searching for him for the past year.

When the police found him, Wang had unkempt hair covered in dust and dirt and he looked like he hadn’t groomed himself in years. The effects of his unstable living conditions not only showed in his appearance, but made a big impact on his body odor as well. Wei-min Ren, who was tasked with questioning Wang on the journey back to the police station, had the short end of the stick as he had to suffer direct assault from Wang’s bad breath.

It was reported that Ren had an incredibly difficult time keeping himself together during the ride, and immediately threw up upon arriving at their destination.

More examples with descriptions: Terrifying, Century-Old Photographs from Neuroscience Experiments

An 1862 monograph by pioneering French neurologist Guillaume-Benjamin-Amand Duchenne de Boulogne (1806-1875) is full of disturbing photos of human subjects. Using electrodes, the scientist triggered muscular contractions in their faces. You know, for science.

The scientist was trying to figure out whether there was some kind of evolutionary basis for facial expressions, so he would shock various parts of his subjects’ faces to see if he could regularly induce certain expressions.