mizzgmr:

Carbide and Carbon Building, 2013
by Gina Marie

Chicago, IL
Art Deco, 1929, designed by Daniel and Hubert Burnham
The exterior is covered in polished black granite, and the tower is dark green terra cotta with golden leaf accents.
Inside:

mizzgmr:

Carbide and Carbon Building, 2013

by Gina Marie

Chicago, IL

Art Deco, 1929, designed by Daniel and Hubert Burnham

The exterior is covered in polished black granite, and the tower is dark green terra cotta with golden leaf accents.

Inside:

This strange cartoon from Harper’s Weekly on May 28, 1887 turned Lady Liberty into a dystopian, Castle Greyskull-style train station.
As awesome as the idea of the Statue of Liberty regurgitating train after train is, it’s doubtful artist W. A. Rogers seriously considered this a vision of the future. Notes Robert C. Kennedy:

The meaning of the cartoon is not readily identifiable. The artist may be fearful (notice the statue’s skull-like face) that the expansion of the elevated railroad system threatens to mar the beauty of the city. The flag (foreground) announcing rail transit to Coney Island may indicate concern that the emerging transportation infrastructure will eventually transform the city’s historic and cultural sights, such as the Statue of Liberty, into cheap carnivals (the train’s path up the statue resembles a roller coaster).
The cartoonist may also have been concerned about the political power and corruption of the railroad companies. In the mid-1880s, competition from the elevated railroads led the owners of horse- car companies to desperate measures, including bribing state legislators and city aldermen.

(io9)

This strange cartoon from Harper’s Weekly on May 28, 1887 turned Lady Liberty into a dystopian, Castle Greyskull-style train station.

As awesome as the idea of the Statue of Liberty regurgitating train after train is, it’s doubtful artist W. A. Rogers seriously considered this a vision of the future. Notes Robert C. Kennedy:

The meaning of the cartoon is not readily identifiable. The artist may be fearful (notice the statue’s skull-like face) that the expansion of the elevated railroad system threatens to mar the beauty of the city. The flag (foreground) announcing rail transit to Coney Island may indicate concern that the emerging transportation infrastructure will eventually transform the city’s historic and cultural sights, such as the Statue of Liberty, into cheap carnivals (the train’s path up the statue resembles a roller coaster).

The cartoonist may also have been concerned about the political power and corruption of the railroad companies. In the mid-1880s, competition from the elevated railroads led the owners of horse- car companies to desperate measures, including bribing state legislators and city aldermen.

(io9)

Ormond Gigli: Girls in the Windows, 1960


In 1960, while a construction crew dismantled a row of brownstones right across from my own brownstone studio on East 58th Street, I was inspired to, somehow immortalize those buildings. I had the vision of 43 women in formal dress adorning the windows of the skeletal facade.We had to work quickly to secure City permissions, arrange for models which included celebrities, the demolition supervisior’s wife (third floor, third from left), my own wife (second floor, far right), and also secure the Rolls Royce to be parked on the sidewalk. Careful planning was a necessity as the photography had to be accomplished during the workers’ lunch time!The day before the buildings were razed, the 43 women appeared in their finest attire, went into the buildings, climbed the old stairs, and took their places in the windows. I was set up on my fire escape across the streeet, directing the scene, with bullhorn in hand. Of course I was concerned for the Models’ safety, as some were daring enough to pose out on the crumbling sills.The photography came off as planned. What had seemed to some as too dangerous or difficult to accomplish, became my fantasy fulfilled, and my most memorable self - assigned photograph. It has been an international award winner ever since.

Ormond Gigli: Girls in the Windows, 1960

In 1960, while a construction crew dismantled a row of brownstones right across from my own brownstone studio on East 58th Street, I was inspired to, somehow immortalize those buildings. I had the vision of 43 women in formal dress adorning the windows of the skeletal facade.

We had to work quickly to secure City permissions, arrange for models which included celebrities, the demolition supervisior’s wife (third floor, third from left), my own wife (second floor, far right), and also secure the Rolls Royce to be parked on the sidewalk. Careful planning was a necessity as the photography had to be accomplished during the workers’ lunch time!

The day before the buildings were razed, the 43 women appeared in their finest attire, went into the buildings, climbed the old stairs, and took their places in the windows. I was set up on my fire escape across the streeet, directing the scene, with bullhorn in hand. Of course I was concerned for the Models’ safety, as some were daring enough to pose out on the crumbling sills.

The photography came off as planned. What had seemed to some as too dangerous or difficult to accomplish, became my fantasy fulfilled, and my most memorable self - assigned photograph. It has been an international award winner ever since.

fernand0:

Devicescape: Profiting From Other People’s Wi-Fi - Businessweek
telecoscmt:

(vía Devicescape: Profiting From Other People’s Wi-Fi - Businessweek)“The Silicon Valley company has assembled a database of more than 8 million “unsecured” wireless routers, owned by coffee shops, cities, and other entities that have either intentionally made them available to the public, or not gotten around to setting up a password to keep freeloaders out. “There’s a huge network that’s been hiding in plain sight,” says David Fraser, Devicescape’s chief executive officer. “Why not use it?””   

fernand0:

Devicescape: Profiting From Other People’s Wi-Fi - Businessweek

telecoscmt:

(vía Devicescape: Profiting From Other People’s Wi-Fi - Businessweek)

“The Silicon Valley company has assembled a database of more than 8 million “unsecured” wireless routers, owned by coffee shops, cities, and other entities that have either intentionally made them available to the public, or not gotten around to setting up a password to keep freeloaders out. “There’s a huge network that’s been hiding in plain sight,” says David Fraser, Devicescape’s chief executive officer. “Why not use it?””