nemvagom:

historicaltimes:

 A 1900 Photograph of Combat Soldier Representatives

gondolom Tiencsinben készült, de basszus milyen jó kép ez

Persze, hogy ott, méghozzá a boxerlázadás közepén, de a balról harmadik úriember bizony szerintem nem orosz, hanem ausztrál.

nemvagom:

historicaltimes:

 A 1900 Photograph of Combat Soldier Representatives

gondolom Tiencsinben készült, de basszus milyen jó kép ez

Persze, hogy ott, méghozzá a boxerlázadás közepén, de a balról harmadik úriember bizony szerintem nem orosz, hanem ausztrál.

greatbuffalotradingpost:

Lower Manhattan skyline at night, seen from either the Staten Island Ferry or Governor’s Island, in February of 1938. (Bofinger, E. M./Courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)
http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/04/historic-photos-from-the-nyc-municipal-archives/100286/

And in 2012:

And here’s a GIF: (I know that I’m not an expert, but it’s good enough)

greatbuffalotradingpost:

Lower Manhattan skyline at night, seen from either the Staten Island Ferry or Governor’s Island, in February of 1938. (Bofinger, E. M./Courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/04/historic-photos-from-the-nyc-municipal-archives/100286/

And in 2012:

And here’s a GIF: (I know that I’m not an expert, but it’s good enough)

Salesman Mike Dreschler has his motorised roller skates refuelled at a petrol station near Hartford, Connecticut. He has a single horsepower air-cooled engine strapped to his back and holds a clutch, accelerator and engine cut-off switch in his hand.
Photo by F. Roy Kemp, 11th May 1961

Salesman Mike Dreschler has his motorised roller skates refuelled at a petrol station near Hartford, Connecticut. He has a single horsepower air-cooled engine strapped to his back and holds a clutch, accelerator and engine cut-off switch in his hand.

Photo by F. Roy Kemp, 11th May 1961

Beautiful Destroyed Structures of the Modern Age

Some of the world’s most beautiful buildings have risen up, only to be destroyed or demolished just a few years or decades later. Here we remember some these great structures for what they once were.

Wonderful Castles and Mansions That Are Haunted by Tragic Ghosts

Sometimes it’s easy to understand how legends of hauntings get started. These towering, incredible castles and mansions look like they should contain spirits — and each one has a fantastic ghost story to go along with it.

This strange cartoon from Harper’s Weekly on May 28, 1887 turned Lady Liberty into a dystopian, Castle Greyskull-style train station.
As awesome as the idea of the Statue of Liberty regurgitating train after train is, it’s doubtful artist W. A. Rogers seriously considered this a vision of the future. Notes Robert C. Kennedy:

The meaning of the cartoon is not readily identifiable. The artist may be fearful (notice the statue’s skull-like face) that the expansion of the elevated railroad system threatens to mar the beauty of the city. The flag (foreground) announcing rail transit to Coney Island may indicate concern that the emerging transportation infrastructure will eventually transform the city’s historic and cultural sights, such as the Statue of Liberty, into cheap carnivals (the train’s path up the statue resembles a roller coaster).
The cartoonist may also have been concerned about the political power and corruption of the railroad companies. In the mid-1880s, competition from the elevated railroads led the owners of horse- car companies to desperate measures, including bribing state legislators and city aldermen.

(io9)

This strange cartoon from Harper’s Weekly on May 28, 1887 turned Lady Liberty into a dystopian, Castle Greyskull-style train station.

As awesome as the idea of the Statue of Liberty regurgitating train after train is, it’s doubtful artist W. A. Rogers seriously considered this a vision of the future. Notes Robert C. Kennedy:

The meaning of the cartoon is not readily identifiable. The artist may be fearful (notice the statue’s skull-like face) that the expansion of the elevated railroad system threatens to mar the beauty of the city. The flag (foreground) announcing rail transit to Coney Island may indicate concern that the emerging transportation infrastructure will eventually transform the city’s historic and cultural sights, such as the Statue of Liberty, into cheap carnivals (the train’s path up the statue resembles a roller coaster).

The cartoonist may also have been concerned about the political power and corruption of the railroad companies. In the mid-1880s, competition from the elevated railroads led the owners of horse- car companies to desperate measures, including bribing state legislators and city aldermen.

(io9)

okkultmotionpictures:

Aluminum on the March (1956)

A Prelinger Archives video.

A series of GIFs excerpted from Aluminium on the March, an outstanding ephemeral film showing how aluminum contributes to everyday living and national defense: appliances, packaging, airplanes, etc. With great stop-motion animation and excellent imagery of aluminum-enabled Fifties America.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE


EXCERPTS by OKKULT MOTION PICTURES: a collection of gifs excerpted from open source/unknown/rare/controversial moving images. A digital humanities project for the diffusion of open knowledge.